1 17 12

more later

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1.17.12

just hours before inet blackout … : (

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vintage clothing – RN (i.e. Registered Number) Labels and id’ing

(for FB clothing group comments, scroll down the page)

Trench coats, ankle boots and capes: What the world’s trendsetters are snapping up on eBay
The auction site’s fashion creative director Andrea Linett says these products are the website’s top 2011 winter season searches thanks to their versatility.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2079901/Trench-coats-ankle-boots-capes-What-worlds-trendsetters-snapping-eBay.html

Trench coats, ankle boots and capes: What the world’s trendsetters are snapping up on eBay

By Hannah Rand

Last updated at 2:39 PM on 30th December 2011

About to hit the sales? Take your cue from the world’s top three fashion capitals before you do.

Savvy shoppers in New York, London and Berlin are snapping up trench coats, ankle boots and capes, according to research from eBay.

The auction site’s fashion creative director Andrea Linett says these products are the website’s top 2011 winter season searches thanks to their versatility.
Burberry: Spring/Summer 2010 – London Fashion Week
Matthew Williamson RTW Autumn/Winter 2010

Fashion must-haves: Trendsetters in London, New York and Berlin have been buying versatile trench coats and capes in a bid to copy the latest catwalk looks

She told MailOnline: ‘Ankle boots are great because you can wear them with skinny jeans, a short skirt and tights, or bare legs, depending on the season.

‘The trench coat is your best bet for outerwear. The belt makes it universally flattering and works over layers during the cold months but gives a little breathing room when spring rolls around.’

More…

Fashion nightmare for Rachel Zoe as American Airlines loses her suitcase stuffed full of designer clothes

Indeed, celebrity stylists such as Rachel Zoe understand the power of a double-breasted, belted cover-up as a transseasonal wardrobe essential.

And model Rosie Huntington Whiteley was styled in nothing else but a trench for the Burberry Body campaign.

When it comes to footwear, the ankle boot is another wardrobe essential proving popular with eBay’s bargain-hunters.
Enlarge eBay’s top searches for 2011

Top trends: eBay found that the most popular fashion searches in London, Berlin and New York included ankle and cowboy boots, trench coats and capes

They know a single pair will take them through winter, spring and summer – making it an excellent choice.

Cowboy-style footwear was another winner, as were racy over-the-knee styles.

Capes also ranked highly in searches, eBay revealed. Though the bulky shape can make them hard to carry off, originality and nostalgic femininity make them a winner in the style stakes.

However, if you’ve bought one and can’t work out to wear it, sell it and get your money back.

There are plenty of trendsetters looking for one online.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2079901/Trench-coats-ankle-boots-capes-What-worlds-trendsetters-snapping-eBay.html#ixzz1inU7lSkI

~~~~~~~~~~~~ And ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://reviews.ebay.com/Clothing-Labels-RN-and-WPL-and-CA?ugid=10000000003229985

Guides by: ikwewe ( 769Feedback score is 500 to 999) Top 1000 Reviewer
257 out of 274 people found this guide helpful.
Guide viewed: 31984 times Tags: Vintage Clothing | Dating Vintage | RN #s | WPL #s | CA #s

The different clothing labels contain a lot of information. Some, like the RN#, can be helpful in determining the age of a garment. You can also identify the maker or importer of the garment. RN#s may be printed on the care label, or on the maker name label. CAUTION: The RN# issue date does not give the manufacture date of the garment.

What is the RN #?
A registered identification number or RN is a number issued by the Federal Trade Commission, upon request, to a business residing in the U.S. that is engaged in the manufacture, importing, distribution, or sale of textile, wool, or fur products. Such businesses are not required to have RNs. They may, however, use the RN in place of a name on the label or tag that is required to be affixed to these products.
http://www.ftc.gov

History
WPL numbers were issued from 1941 through 1959 under the Wool Products Labeling Act. WPL numbers begin at 00101 and end at 13669. All numbers issued subsequently are RN numbers.

RN numbers were issued under the Fur Products Labeling Act from 1952 through 1959. These numbers start at 00101 and continue to 04086. Beginning in 1959, all numbers issued are RN under the combined act and commence with 13670. The final number contained in this edition is 112208. Complete rules and regulations under the Wool Act,Fur Act, and the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act can be obtained by writing to Textile Section, Division of Enforcement, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue. NW,Washington, D.C. 20580.
RN and WPL Encyclopedia, with thanks to *fortuna* for obtaining this information.

RN Database
Once you find the RN #, you can look it up on the RN database. The database started August 6, 1998, and that is the default issue date given to all existing RN #s at that time. If you look up the RN # and see an issue date of August 6, 1998, the number was actually issued earlier. Expired numbers were not entered into the database. This is a link to the database:

https://rn.ftc.gov/pls/TextileRN/wrnquery$.startup

You can enter the RN #, or WPL #, and a search will bring up the company that has that number. This is very helpful if you have the RN # and no maker tag. If the company is in the database, you can find out who made or imported the garment. Some older numbers may not appear in the database if they were not current when the database was created.

If you have a maker tag, and you are trying to determine how old the garment is, but you don’t have the RN #, you can enter the company name into the database, and, if the company has a number, it will come up with the company name and address.

How to Estimate the RN # Issue Date
Since the database doesn’t have the actual issue dates for the numbers before August 6, 1998, how do we determine approximately when the number was issued?

A formula was worked out on the Vintage Clothing & Accessories Board by nouveauarts and me. This works only for the numbers issued since 1959. It was determined that an average of 2635 numbers have been issued per year. The earliest number in the series beginning in 1959 is 13670. The formula is:

Your RN #
-13670 (first RN # in series)
Total #s between the original and yours/2635(average #s issued per year) = # of years since issue date
1959 + # of years since issue date = estimated year of issue

What Does the Estimated Year of Issue Tell You?
This is NOT the date the garment was made. It is the earliest date the garment could have been made. It is not the date the garment was made because companies may keep the same RN # as long as they are in business. It is helpful if you have something you think may have been made in either the 1960s or the 1980s. If the RN # was issued in the 80s, you can rule out the earlier dates. If it was issued in the 60s, you will need to use other means to determine a date for the garment.

NOTE: If something has an RN # of 13670 or higher, it cannot be older than 1959.

CA #s
The equivalent registration number in Canada is a CA #, and may be researched on the Canadian government site. This is the address:

http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/ic1.nsf/eng/home

©2007 Elaine Schuster 3/22/2007







FB clothing group:

Deborah Andersen:
For those that don’t know about this site, this is where I go when I need to look up RN #’s that are on the clothing labels that have them for dating purposes.
Application For a Registered Identification Number (“RN”)
https://rn.ftc.gov/pls/textilern/wrnquery$.startup

Deborah Andersen:
Here is a guide on ebay that explains more information.
http://reviews.ebay.com/Clothing-Labels-RN-and-WPL-and-CA?ugid=10000000003229985
eBay Guides – Clothing Labels — RN and WPL and CA
reviews.ebay.com
The different clothing labels contain a lot of information. Some, like the RN , …See More

Sherry Gilson:
Deborah thanks for posting this, remember though that the RN # only means the date when the company filed cannot always mean the year the garment was made.

Sherry Gilson:
What Does the Estimated Year of Issue Tell You? This is NOT the date the garment was made. It is the earliest date the garment could have been made. It is not the date the garment was made because companies may keep the same RN # as long as they are in business. It is helpful if you have something you think may have been made in either the 1960s or the 1980s. If the RN # was issued in the 80s, you can rule out the earlier dates. If it was issued in the 60s, you will need to use other means to determine a date for the garment.
NOTE: If something has an RN # of 13670 or higher, it cannot be older than 1959.

Deborah Andersen:
thats right Sherry, thanks for making that clear to other viewers.

Sherry E Pinedo:
Deborah and Sherry, Please explain to me what the RN # is for and why I need to look it up. Thanks in advance!

Sherry Gilson:
Sherry E Pinedo RN# help identify the age or there about of clothing, this is especially helpful when you are selling vintage, but can also help with newer more recent items. WPL # were issued from 1941-1959 then changed to RN#. If you click on the link that Deborah provided it will give you a great understanding of the possible date of the garment. Sometimes there will not be a label but there will be a RN # and you can check what company it belongs to which will tell you the manufacture. Remember that there are companies that own several labels like Liz Claiborne, read that article we posted a few days ago about LC, her other labels you will be surprised to see.

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*1.7*

This week: Cleaned up office, cleared out old inventory

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1.6.

s

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Last Day!

… of 2011
more later

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Weldon’s Practical Needlework

am now on a quest to get my copies of the following Weldon’s Practical Needlework

This is a cover from the “Weldon’s Illustrated Dressmaker”, October 1895.

from wikipedia:
Weldon’s Ladies’ Journal (1875–1954) supplied dressmaking patterns, and was a blueprint for subsequent ‘home weeklies’.

Weldon’s Practical Needlework
Volume 1 – practical knitting, patchwork & crochet, stitches explained.
Volume 2 – stocking knitter, cross-stitch embroidery, crewel work, bazaar articles, knitting, crochet, smocking, appliqué work, netting, lace, crochet edgings, knitting edgings.
Volume 3 – lace shawls, crocheted evening bags using macramé cord (corday).
Volume 4 – knitting, crochet, Mountmellick embroidery, smocking, tatting, decorative needlework, beadwork, macramé lace.
Volume 5- knitting, Mountmellick, crochet, drawn thread work,netting.
Volume 6 – crochet, knitting, ivory embroidery, canvas embroidery, jewelled embroidery, patchwork, linen embroidery, Mountmellick embroidery, macramé lace
Volume 7 – crinkled paper work, knick-knacks, ivory embroidery, knitting, crochet, church embroidery, Mountmellick embroidery, Japanese curtain work.
Volume 8 – crochet, Hungarian embroidery, church decorations, crinkled paper work, Mountmellick embroidery, knitting, Bulgarian embroidery.
Volume 9 – plain needlework, stock knitting, Mountmellick embroidery, crinkled and crepe tissue paper work, knitting, monograms & initials.
Volume 10 – appliqué embroidery, crochet, knitting, leather work, pincushions, point lace, ribbon plaiting.
Volume 11 – bent iron work, crochet, knitting, macramé & bead work, point lace, stocking knitter, torchon lace.
Volume 12 – crochet & knitted waistcoats, drawn thread work, knitting, Mountmellick embroidery, smocking, stocking knitter.

Publisher

Walter Weldon also founded Weldon’s Fashion Journal (one of the covers, above) Weldon’s Patterns, and Weldon’s Household Encyclopaedia.

His publications in the late 1800s were through Weldon & Company, a pattern company who produced hundreds of patterns and projects for numerous types of Victorian needlework. Around 1888, the company began to publish a series of books entitled Weldon’s Practical Needlework, each volume consisting of the various newsletters (one year of publications) bound together with a cloth cover and costing 2 shilling/6 pence.

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finding cool things to list

going through the pantry today – found lots of vintage things that I’ll never use – time to sell them to you : )

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well this is cool …

How to Make / Create Your Own Website: The Beginner’s A-Z Guide

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Down The Avenue Of Ninety Years – Martha Campbell Vivian

Book just acquired – hope to someday type it all out – great diary of mid 1800’s:
Down The Avenue Of Ninety Years – Martha Campbell Vivian

Down The Avenue Of Ninety Years

Reminiscences of Martha Campbell Vivian

With Twenty Illustrations from Daguerrotypes and Photographs

Privately Printed

1924

_____________________________________________________________________

Copyright, 1924 by

Martha Campbell Vivian

____

All Rights reserved

Printed in the United States of America

______________________________________________________

CONTENTS

Chapters

I. Early Childhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

II. Little Girlhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

III. School Days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

IV. Religious Services and Ministers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

V. Marriage and Young Motherhood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

VI. The Texas Venture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  74

VII. War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87

VIII. Some Stories of our neighborhood . . . . . . . . . . . 112

IX. Later Life and Modern Inventions . . . . . . . . . . . .  131

____________________________________________________________

Down the Avenue Of Ninety Years
Chapter I
Early Childhood

I was born and cradled in the South, in the fine old State of Alabama. My parents were James Campbell and Eliza Ann Jennings and the date of my birth, July 17th, 1831.
When I was about five years old my mother was in very poor health and the physician whom my father consulted advised a change of climate.
My mother’s parents lived in Missouri and my father decided to turn his face in that direction.
He was the owner of many slaves, to whom he gave the choice of staying in Alabama or going to the new country with him. A few remained, but the majority went with him to Missouri. Those who chose to go with their master were John and Dan, Liza and her two children, Susan and Thornton, Polly and several children. Letty and one child, of whom I will say more later, remained in Alabama. All were good servants and we were very much attached to them.
[1]
We went to Missouri by land in 1836. The carriage in which we made the trip was large and well suited to the journey, and except for its quaint lines would not be much out of style even now, as it was fitted out with something of the same luxuriousness as the present-day limousine. The inside of the carriage was upholstered in a drab-colored cloth, with cushions or the same, trimmed with fringe and braid. At the windows were drab silk curtains trimmed with the fringe, and the same silk material formed a canopy in the top of the carriage. Swung across the top of the carriage was a small net hammock, which my mother found convenient and useful for extra wraps and other things. The steps of the carriage were carpeted and these could be let down to the ground when one was entering the carriage, and afterwards, folded up.
Of all that happened along the journey, I Can recall only two things. One was that my brother Robert rode a large and beautiful black horse called Morgan, and that unfortunately Morgan died on the road. Very faintly do I remember everyone standing around looking very sorrowful over his loss. Then Brother Robert took a seat on the outside of the carriage with my father, who was driving. John , who usually drove the carriage, on this particular occasion was driving a wagon containing our household goods.
The second incident, one that I remember very distinctly and have often told my children, happened on the last day of our journey. All were tired from the many continuous days of traveling, for it took us about
[2]

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